Leanne Ford Revisited

It’s finally Friday and you deserve a treat. A treat for the eyes – eye candy, if you will.

Leanne Ford strikes just the right balance between industrial-cool (through her use of concrete and metal) and natural warmth (through her use of warm, natural wood). Interior and exterior spaces can very easily look too cold once too many industrial elements are introduced; however, Leanne Ford always manages to create welcoming spaces full of warmth and character, which almost give off a soft glow with the help of some natural daylight.

The pictures below were not all taken from one residence but are in fact a collection of images that I feel best demonstrate the aforesaid balance/equilibrium she manages to achieve.

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Click here for more Leanne Ford goodness.


Yellow Brick Home

I stumbled upon Yellow Brick Home about a month ago and have been hooked ever since. Kim and Scott are DIY experts – a husband and wife duo from Chicago who have turned their (almost 130-year-old) house into a beautiful home with their own bare hands. They also run The Pet Shop and The Print Shop.

Simple, all-American and timeless, their home is full of hidden treasures and fun little details, topped off with a generous sprinkling of love and adorable dogs for good measure.














A few things that stand out to me most (apart from their clearly impeccable taste) are:

(1) the paint colours – sophisticated neutrals that are just different enough from the standard neutral wall colours to keep things interesting but still timeless. If I had to pick a favourite paint colour from their home, it would have to be Benjamin Moore’s Intense White used on their living room and bathroom walls; the soft warm tint keeps the rooms warm and inviting but still bright and fresh;

(2) the light fixtures – many of which are from Rejuvenation. Again, simple, timeless classics;

(3) the gorgeous headboards;

(4) the rugs; and

(5) the amazing mosaic honeycomb tiles on the bathroom floor (which they also DIY’d themselves!).

If you enjoyed this post and/or enjoy DIY, I highly recommend checking out their Pinterest and Instagram for more!

Refined Sophistication by Studio Piet Boon

“Founded in 1983 by Dutch designer Piet Boon (1958), the Studio Piet Boon philosophy is based on a balance between functionality, aesthetics and individuality.”

Headquartered in the Netherlands, Studio Piet Boon is all about refined sophistication.

This urban residence in Amsterdam has a certain hotel-like sensibility, with its minimal lines and natural stone materials. Perhaps it’s due to the lack of personal belongings in the shots but it’s hard to imagine anyone actually living here long-term. The apartment feels more like a luxury vacation rental than anything else. Nonetheless, the architectural feel of the apartment is undeniably a treat for the eyes.

Studio Piet Boon 1

Studio Piet Boon 2

The all-white walls allow natural daylight to take centre stage without detracting from elegant architectural pieces such as the scaled-up kitchen island constructed out of large slabs of natural stone.

The crystal drop pendant light infuses a touch of femininity and glamour to the bright and minimal bedroom.

Studio Piet Boon 7

The levels of concrete leading up to the bathtub create a striking spa-like effect in the bathroom.

More Studio Piet Boon here.

Understated Luxury by Studio Tate

The penthouse exudes understated luxury in its finest details, from the carefully selected marble, to the intricately designed ceiling strapping and custom cabinetry.

Melbourne-based interior architecture studio, Studio Tate, designed this minimal but luxe penthouse for an empty-nester couple. The couple favours monochrome interiors, so a predominantly black and white colour palette was selected. The penthouse exudes understated luxury in its finest details, from the carefully selected marble, to the intricately designed ceiling strapping and custom cabinetry.

Bold splashes of colour (such as the bright teal couch, chartreuse velvet armchairs and colourful artwork) prevent the space from being too monochrome and add visual interest. Areas that would benefit more from the calming effect of a neutral palette were kept neutral, such as the bedroom and bathroom.

Some of my favourite elements are the ceiling strapping, the mid-century modern furniture pieces, the clean lines, the glamorous touches of gold and brass, the pendant light over the dining table* and the statement-making marble selection.

*See my post on Douglas and Bec for a great selection of similar pendant lights.

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More understated luxury to feast your eyes on, on Studio Tate’s website.